World Spay Day

Share Button

spayneuter2February is dedicated to Spay/Neuter Awareness and February 26th World Spay Day.

Join us along with our friends in the pet community to raise awareness of the health and well-being benefits from spaying or neutering your pet. You can read more efforts to raise awareness and about the statistics regarding the volume of unwanted pets euthanized in the US at the Humane Society site: https://spaydayportal.humanesociety.org/aboutworldspayday/whyworldspayday/

The numbers are staggering. We have a real problem in this country with unplanned and unwanted pets. Of course our first reaction is to improve the rate of spaying/neutering, but there are other viewpoints on that.

To add some complexity to this discussion, there seems to be some growing controversy about the health benefits. Dr, Karen Becker of Mercola Healthy Pets has written numerous articles, and even produced a 3-part video series on some of the drawbacks of spaying/neutering your pet: http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2011/02/17/dangers-of-early-pet-spaying-or-neutering.aspx

Ted Kerasote, author of the best -seller Merle’s Door also provides an insightful dissenting opinion in his new book Pukka’s Promise.

What about you readers – what do you think? Please tell us your thoughts in the comments below.

 

Share Button
Tags:

7 Comments

  1. I don’t think that being worried about Cushing’s Disease is a good enough reason to not spay your pet. A dog can get cushings whether or not they are spayed. I’ve seen horrible mammary tumors and other gross things because people didn’t spay their pet. I think I’d rather deal with cushings if I had to pick.
    Ann Paws recently posted…Pet Food – The Best Way to Start a Heated DebateMy Profile

    • Good point, thanks for the comment Ann.

  2. Dr Becker is speaking, I believe, only to *early* spay/neuter that is often promoted by those who back Mandatory Spay Neuter programs, also called “pediatric” spay/neuter at 6 to 8 weeks and when the pet weighs at least 2#s.

    This is a problem when legislatures get involved with what is a Dr/client decision. It is not good for all dog breeds to be fixed so early and can lead to bone cancer and other ills, esp in larger breeds whose bones develop later.

    Early fixing prematurely ends the hormones that course throughout the entire body of the dog or cat, promoting many different aspects of good health.

    It is also imperative that shelters do not perpetuate the population problem and so easier to adopt kittens who have been fixed because then there will be no mistakes or forgotten follow up appointments or even argument about doing it at all.

    Shelters could not possibly hold a puppy or kitten for three plus months until their just before their first heat cycle. It’s not financially feasible.
    Mary E Haight ( recently posted…World Spay Day Today!My Profile

    • Thanks Mary. It does seem that early fixing can increase the likelihood of some diseases, especially in males. See Torres de la Riva, Hart, et al. In their study, the authors studied incidence rates in Golden Retrievers of hip dysplasia (HD), cranial cruciate ligament tear (CCL), lymphosarcoma (LSA), hemangiosarcoma (HSA), and mast cell tumor (MCT) based on when and if a dog was spayed or neutered. They noted differences in males/females and early vs late fixing. http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0055937#abstract0

      You are right to point out that we have a population problem– more dogs/cats than available homes– and that fixing pets can help address this. The U.S. Humane Society estimates that animal shelters care for 6-8 million dogs and cats every year in the United States, of whom approximately 3-4 million are euthanized. The financial burden to capture, care for and euthanize these ‘strays’ is estimated to be $2+ billion per year.

  3. Thank you for participating in the BTC4A World Spay Day Blog Hop. I do believe it’s important to look at the possible drawbacks of spay/neuter, and some pet owners may want to consider nonsurgical methods. But with the vast number of dogs and cats who are homeless, spay/neuter does provides the most cost-effective way of dealing with pet overpopulation – thereby reducing the number of healthy animals euthanized each year.
    Vicki Cook recently posted…Pet Owners Estimated to Spend More Than $55 Billion on Pets in 2013My Profile

    • Thanks Vicki.

      There is an overpopulation problem and the stats bear repeating: The U.S. Humane Society estimates that animal shelters care for 6-8 million dogs and cats every year in the United States, of whom approximately 3-4 million are euthanized. The financial burden to capture, care for and euthanize these ‘strays’ is estimated to be $2+ billion per year. Wow!

      Until we get this under control, it certainly presents a strong argument for fixing the pets, albeit at the appropriate age (see earlier comment about the potential harm of early spaying/neutering).

  4. This is very important as it cna add years to the life expectancely of your dog.
    Peaches recently posted…Ear Infections in DogsMy Profile

Comments are now closed on this post.