Dl-Methionine in Dog Food

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Methionine structureMoving on to the letter D in our A to Z Dog Food Ingredient series. Today we examine why Dl-Methionine is in Dog Food.

 

What is Dl-Methionine?

Methionine is an essential amino acid that is important for many bodily functions. Dl-Methionine is a synthetic version of this amino acid. Methionine is primarily found in meat, fish, and dairy products.

 

Common names for Dl-Methionine

There aren’t many alternative names for DL-Methionine although Methionine is often referred to as DL-Methionine, L-2-amino-4-(methylthio) butyric acid, and L-Methionine.

 

Why is Dl-Methionine included in dog food?

Dl-Methionine added to dog food to ensure that the dog is receiving the essential nutrient. It is more often present in lower quality foods that use plant based proteins as part of their recipes.

 

Is Dl-Methionine a commonly used ingredient in dog food?

Dl-Methionine is a fairly common dog food ingredient. It is present in 15% of all dog foods. Some form of Methionine is in 16% of all dog foods.

 

Common benefits or risks of Dl-Methionine

Dietary methionine is a potent antioxidant and an important amino acid for liver repair due to its ability to assist in the body’s detoxification process. Methionine helps prevent skin and nail problems.

 

DL-Methionine is often added to dog food to reduce the ph level in urine and is sometimes called the ‘grass saver’.

 

An overabundance of DL-Methionine can lead to hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis). DL- Methionine might also make liver disease worse.

 

neutral slimdoggySlimdoggy Ingredient Comfort Level

Dog diets that are rich in meat and fish will likely not need to be supplemented with DL-Methionine. It is far better to obtain this essential amino acid through whole foods than through artificially created forms. Because it is essential but not the most natural version of the amino acid, DL-Methionine gets the SlimDoggy neutral rating.

 

Miscellaneous facts about Dl-Methionine

Because it reduces histamine release, methionine may be useful in some allergy cases.

Research shows that methionine supplementation may be helpful in treating Parkinson’s disease.

 

Sources and further reading

http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/methionine-amino-acid-support-for-your-liver.html

http://www.herbs2000.com/amino_acids/methionine.htm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC299913/

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-42-METHIONINE.aspx?activeIngredientId=42&activeIngredientName=METHIONINE

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24 Comments

  1. Again thank you for sharing your research.
    Bailey recently posted…Garden UpdateMy Profile

  2. Didn’t know about this one. I should use it to help my nails!
    Sand Spring Chesapeakes recently posted…Tasty Tuesday~Brothers Complete-USA Dehydrated Sweet PotatoMy Profile

  3. That’s interesting, many thanks for your research, I made a food folder on my pc where I save all food-related posts and artices.
    easy rider recently posted…easyblog TURBULENT TUESDAYMy Profile

  4. Very interesting. I agree it is better to get it out of whole food, and I think you rated it pawfectly.
    Hope you have a great day!
    ღ husky hugz ღ frum our pack at Love is being owned by a husky!
    Jenna,Mark “HuskyCrazed” Drady recently posted…Husky fun at Bedrock kennels!My Profile

  5. Thanks for stopping by Barking from the Bayou today! As you saw, I mentioned your cool app and find myself using often to check the ratings that you give a particular brand. We took Bentley to a new vet yesterday. One that is AAHA certified. He put Bentley on a prescription probiotic food to counteract some food allergies. I may need to ask you about an over-the-counter equivalent. Bentley is eating more expensive food than we do! The vet was great though!
    M. K. Clinton recently posted…Hurricane Preparedness for PetsMy Profile

    • We’re happy to help and thanks for the shout out. Did the vet say what he thought Bentley was allergic too? Jack is allergic to chicken, but also has IBD, so we have to exclude chicken, beef, dairy. We use the food database to identify possible foods because you can search it and exclude certain ingredients. That might help you find an alternative choice for Bentley.
      mkob recently posted…Dl-Methionine in Dog FoodMy Profile

  6. As always, the Boys and I appreciate your time and research that you so willingly share with all of us. I learned a great deal from this post. Didn’t know – now I do! Thanks Slim
    Cathy recently posted…SPRINGFIELD DAYS | GROOVY GOLDENDOODLESMy Profile

  7. Life with dogs and cats, have nominated you for our guest blog Share It Sunday. You don’t have to do anything just send us the link to the post you’d like us to showcase and we will host it on Sunday. You can also email us the link to the blogger you’d like to nominate for the Sunday after.
    We are at mollyDOTthewallyATbtinternetDOTcom.
    Have a terrific Tuesday.
    Best wishes Molly
    Molly The Wally recently posted…Canned Laughter On Tasty Tuesday!My Profile

  8. Mom says it is not working if it is in our food, so she should get some and just sprinkle it on the lawn spots! Interesting chemical.
    Emma recently posted…Kissable Dog Breath and Mighty Tasty Joint HelpMy Profile

  9. Great information. I always learn something when I stop by this site. Thanks for helping us keep our pets healthy!
    Kelsie recently posted…My First Giveaway!My Profile

  10. Thanks for all your great research. We have always read labels, but now we are better informed. on ingredients we can’t pronounce.
    jan recently posted…So Microsoft technical support calls to tell me I have a virus on my computer…My Profile

  11. Very interesting. Thanks for educating us.
    2 brown dawgs recently posted…Where Did It Go?My Profile

  12. actually, DL-methionine and L-methionine are NOT the same thing. DL is a synthetic version of the amino acid while L is the more natural form. DL has to be broken down by the body to be utilized and it seems to be less efficient from what I have been reading. DL is also cheaper than L and is ‘more stable’ meaning it doesn’t break down as quickly so it doesn’t reduce the shelf life of the product – which we all know they like to keep as long as possible to increase profit.

    As for it reducing acid. not true. it is actually an acidifier.. it is used in cat food to enhance palitablity since cats generally won’t eat a low meat diet with out enticement, and to counter act the alkalizing properties of all those plants in kibble. It is often given to cats who suffer from struvite crystals to help keep them from forming, since they have a much harder time in acidic urine… although one has to be careful because if you create urine that is too acidic you run the risk of oxolate stones, which are much more difficult to get rid of.

    As for saving the grass.. yup, alkaline urine does burn grass.. http://www.warreneckstein.com/p/Dogs–Puppies/Grass-Saver—for-use-with-Dogs-only/32758.html;jsessionid=490B67870278736245BC0CDC429EABEE
    Connie recently posted…Opt to adopt – Shooting at the Shelter SeriesMy Profile

    • Yes, we meant to write PH reducer, not acid reducer. Thanks for the correction. Will change it in the post to avoid confusion.

      We also didn’t clam that L- and DL- are the same. Just that there are other forms of Methionine in pet food.

      In any case, we always prefer foods that supply the essentials from whole foods when possible vs. added or artificially created ways.
      steve recently posted…Jack and the White PoppyMy Profile

  13. I learn something new almost every time I come here. I definatly know to avoid this now. My dogs will be getting in through their diet not through processed food. Thanks for sharing the info 🙂
    Stacey recently posted…The Battle of the Scooby SnackMy Profile

  14. Our Lab, R, has had to take L-methionine supplements for almost his whole life. Without them, his urinary pH gets much too high, and he gets struvite micro-crystals (and becomes incontinent). I didn’t realize the potential bad effects, but I\’m not sure that we have any choice in the matter. Without the supplements, he could get big bladder stones. I didn\’t realize that it\’s included in many dog foods. We “home cook” R’s food so it’s not in his food.I learn something almost every time I visit here!
    KB recently posted…Almost Wordless Wednesday: Sunset in the DesertMy Profile

    • Sometimes you have to weigh the benefits with the potential harm. It’s good you don’t add more in his food though. Thanks for stopping by – we love that kind of feedback!
      mkob recently posted…Jack and the White PoppyMy Profile

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